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really avert the fiscal cliff 4908% of american families, at least when it comes to income tax. and it's necessary. we know what happened over the last several decades when it comes to progressivity, income inequality in our country. it's the worst it's been in almost 90 years. through 1980 and 2005, in a 25 year period in time, more than 80% of total increase of american income went to the wealthiest 1%. since the recession ended, more than 90% of the income growth in america has gone to the top 1%, while the media income to the middle class has declined to i could go on and give illustrations. i don't think i need to. at least to this group, but i will tell you when we address the issue of revenue and taxes, i have insisted in every meeting i've been in from simpson-bowles to all the games, but it has to at least protect their current progressivity of the tax code, if not improved for those of lower income categories. i think that's a starting principle for those. the second thing is that we must insist on is to protect the safety net for america. make no mistake. as good as we are t
td ameritrade. >> jennifer: as we crawl toward the fiscal cliff remember that president obama has the majority of the american electorate on his side. he has the majority of the u.s. senate on his side too. but the one place he does not have the majority is the house of representatives, of course, where republicans out number democrats. that's the only place republicans have any leverage. so what will the democrats there do to help the president out? minority leader nancy pelosi offered insight to have at meeting with second of treasury quite miles an hour. ry geithner. >> there are tough choices it isn't easy but it's necessary, i have confidence that my republican colleagues will see the light. and at least pass a new tax cut so we have that legal of confidence and we can go from there. >> jennifer: sound like she is saying the republicans might not be tough enough to do the right thing. sound like she's got the president's back. now, to take us inside the house democrat i can caucus we are turn to go a great, re
geithner may have frightened people yesterday saying the white house is prepared to go off the fiscal cliff unless republicans bend on taxes. a comment by former democratic potential candidate howard deen frightened republicans that the debate is not just about raising taxes on the rich. >> the truth is everybody needs to take more taxes, not just the rich. that's a good start, but we're not going to get out of the deficit problem unless we raise taxes across the board. to go back to what bill clinton had. >> now, some liberals pushed the president to invoke the 14th amendment claiming that gives him the executive power to raise the debt limit himself, but jay said today the white house studied that proposition and decided the president does not have that executive power meaning we headed for another show down with congress over raising the debt ceiling. lou: the fiscal cliff and now a new ultimatum on the national debt ceiling. you suppose this is the last condition? >> it's going to be a wild couple of months, maybe everybody thought with the election over, there was going to be peace and
for everything he has done. [laughter] and now we can talk about the fiscal cliff. let me start off just by -- we will do the house rules, except we will cut in half. 30 seconds -- then we will have time to elaborate on all this. i want to go through the panel. what do think the odds are that some kind of the deal will be cut by january 1 in order to avoid sequestration and all the tax hikes? mark, i will start with you. >> i think it is 80% that we will avoid sequestration. the question is, though, is this going to be a big enough deal, and will actually be enough of a down payment that it will lead to something else subsequently that will actually avoid the kind of enormous consequences of $16 trillion of debt? that percentage will be lower than the 80%. >> let's come back to the big picture -- in the short term, by january 1 -- will we avoid the cliff? >> i think it is likely that we avoid it. it does not appear that that is going so well. it is so easy for us just to do the things we need to do. i think the real line in the sand is going to be the debt ceiling. i really do think -- i have sai
parties can't get together to come to agreement on avoiding the fiscal cliff. it's as if some are in denial that there was an election and that the president won reelection. and that a whole bunch of us won reelection to the senate and to the house. it's as if the ideological rigidity is still indoctrinaire. and the lesson as that the people were telling us about -- and the lessons that the people were telling us about bipartisanship, that they demand bipartisanship, as if the parties and their leaders didn't understand that that's what the american people were demanding. and here, as the drumbeat grows louder as we approach december 31st and falling off the fiscal cliff. now, there's an easy cliff, whatever your ideology and your approach to this. it can be hammered out next year when we are doing major things, such as a rewrite of the i.r.s. tax code and all that that can portend in producing revenue. by making the code more streamlined and in the process get rid of a lot of the underbrush, loopholes, utilize that revenue to lower rates. but that's for another day after long
the fiscal cliff. eye roncally enough, something the house of representatives passed last may. in april set out a tax plan. in may passed a sequestration plan, went to the senate and said we're going to see you in the lame duck time period. we're in the lame duck and this had has to be solved. we have to solve the problem. the first thing is to define what the problem even is. it seems one group is talking about the real problems, the fiscal cliff, and the other group is talking about the real problem, the debt and deficit. what is the real issue? we have $16.3 trillion in debt as a nation. $1 trillion of overspending or each year for the last four years. let me set the example of what this really means. in 2007, our tax revenue, how much we were bringing in the treasury, is almost exactly what it is in 2012. from 2007 to 2012, the revenue is almost identical. the difference is our spending has gone up $1 trillion a year. from 2007 to 2012. so over the course of that time it's slowly built up. but each year we've been over $1 trillion in spending. while our revenue has stayed consistent bas
off the fiscal cliff. we have people out there trying to undermine our way of life. there is a lot to be afraid of -- al qaeda coming back to our shores, recruiting american citizens to help their endeavors. i hate to say it. in every war we have ever been in, there have been occasions where americans joined the enemy. and in world war ii, that happened. you had german saboteurs land in long island, aided and abetted by american citizens sympathetic to the nazis. all of those american citizens in in re curran were held in military custody and tried by the military because we have long understood that when you join the enemy, that is not a crime but an act of war. we have very bad people who get a right to a jury trial. i will be the first one to say that when you go to court, no matter if you're the worst terrorist in the world, you will get a jury trial, you will get a lawyer and you will have your due process rights. but the difference that i'm trying to inform the body of, when you're fighting a war, the goal is not to prosecute people. the goal is to win. and how do you win a w
of the congressional black caucus, believe it or not, do not agree 100% on how to solve the so-called fiscal cliff situation. but, there is 100% agreement, 100% agreement, among congressional black caucus leaders, that we do not want an austerity cliff where we have -- where this leads to increased poverty and exacerbates the hardship for low and middle class families. and that the wealthiest individuals and corporations should have to pay their fair share of taxes. as a member of the budget committee and the democratic chair of the congressional caucus for women's issues, i have a lot of thoughts on the fiscal cliff negotiations. first of all, we must include a robust extension of federal unemployment benefits for workers. mr. scott, has there ever been a time when the unemployment rate, 7.%, has ever been this high and on a bipartisan basis, on a bipartisan basis, this congress has not provided extended unemployment basis for workers? mr. scott: if the gentlelady would yield. the practice that we would -- it is generally the practice we would extend emergency unemployment compensation for longer
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8